Beating back a super power – Play testing Kotay

After an induction to Go, we started a game of Kotay with Spike, Elof, Mundhra and myself.

Spike (blue) set out with the explicit aim of destroying Elof (yellow). Elof went on an offensive that was checked by Spike.

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We formed and alliance against Elof and Mundhra. With some help from me, Spike destroyed Elof’s capital and became the owner of vast resources (which he kindly split with me.) At this stage, Spike seemed like an invincible super-power.

He antagonized me by building a fort quite close to my capital. Mundhra and myself took Spike’s advice and allied against him. I helped Mundhra build a fort and a cannon and sent my own cannon forth to attack Spike.

My attack against Spike was successful but my Capital was destroyed by the very cannon’s that I helped Mundhra forge.

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Kudos to Spike for some splendid playing on his very first game.

Spike noted that the end game is bit of luck because it is based on dice. Elof suggested using a different version of dice throw – for attack and defense. We will have a think about this.

Apparently, Abhishek Mundhra’s first Kotay victory. Congrats! 🙂

4 thoughts on “Beating back a super power – Play testing Kotay

  1. This sounds like super intense game. I hope spike will play again to assure us that this was not just beginners luck!

    I wonder how new players take the making and breaking of the alliances in the game. Do they understand that all alliances are bound to be broken?

    Also, should there be some cost in breaking treaty?

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    1. That’s a great idea Anagh. A formal pact – with a cost (resources exchange) associated with it when you break it. Maybe we can put this in as a variation of the game? Thank!

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      1. I like this idea of formal pacts with resources to pay as the bond value. But, later on, when the game becomes generally abundant in resources, this would be inconsequential. Or maybe, the price should be set by the treaty framers. That way, the bond price goes up with inflation.

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